How Our Anti-Harassment Enforcement Machine Churns Out “High Value Harassers”

Time Magazine just named the “Silence Breakers,” harbingers of the #MeToo movement, as its 2017 Persons of the Year.  According to Time, the #MeToo movement marks a watershed moment in American labor history that will end workplace sexual harassment once and for all. Because of the #MeToo movement, TV pundits have speculated, women now feel empowered to speak up about harassment and as a consequence, companies will immediately clamp down on “High Value Harassers” like Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose, Roy Moore, Al Franken, Glen Thrush, Louis CK, Jeffrey Tambor, Kevin Spacey, Bill O’Reilly, Donald Trump . . . and . . .

Um, not exactly. My cynicism comes not just from a jaundiced view of the Nature of Man, but also from experience: three years as an EEOC prosecutor (1997-2000) and 17 years representing EMPLOYERS (e.g. big ones, small ones and in between). As a civil rights geek, I’ve also researched and written extensively about whether our model for enforcing anti-discrimination and anti-harassment laws–namely, the Civil Rights Act of 1991–has WORKED to deliver on Title VII’s promise of equal employment opportunity (EEO) for all, HERE.

And the truth is, our model for preventing and addressing workplace sexual harassment has become a silly Sylvester McMonkey McBean Machine in which nothing much changes except money changing hands . . . between employers, insurance carriers, and lawyers.

In the classic Dr. Seuss tale “Sneetches,” Sylvester McMonkey McBean built a special machine to resolve tensions between Sneetches who had bellies with stars, and Sneetches who had none upon thars. McBean’s machine could apply AND remove stars . . . for a handsome fee. Eventually, after every last cent of their money was spent, the Sneetches figured out that they’d been tricked: the machine really did nothing at all.

Our anti-harassment enforcement machine is just another contraption in which nothing much changes except money changing hands.

In our Sylvester McMonkey McBean Sexual Harassment contraption, allegations of sexual harassment go into the machine, which spits out M-O-N-E-Y, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements (NDA’s), and “divorces” that end the employment relationship forever. And each time a victim of workplace harassment gets run through the machine, the harasser grows bigger, stronger, and bolder in his serial harassment of women. He knows that he is a “High Value Harasser,” the subject of a carefully contemplated cost-benefit calculation that prompts companies to set aside financial reserves and buy more expensive Employment Practices Liability (EPL) insurance to mitigate the KNOWN RISK. For organizations protecting High Value Harassers, the decision is purely economic: the worth of the High Value Harasser exceeds the cost of paying out sexual harassment claims.

Yep That’s Harassment Indeed!” tells the story of the “High Value Harasser” in musical form–stay tuned for the video! In this song, the listener initially wonders whether the creep realizes that he’s a creepy harasser; the last verse, however, explains his thinking:

Now, I make them good money
So I’ll get my honey
Whenever and wherever I please

Just write me up
Like legal makeup
The lawyers we need to appease

We’ll write a check
Who gives a heck?
We set aside cash for these fees

When money matters
The owners would rather
Pay off silly claims like these

Because of this reality, High Value Harassers have preyed upon women in the workplace for generations. After all, sexual harassment has been illegal since 1986, when the U.S. Supreme Court decided Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson, the first case to find that sexual harassment violated Title VII. Since 1986, an entire industry of anti-harassment training emerged, making annual anti-harassment training the industry standard for claim prevention. But training has not prevented High Value Harassers from pursuing women at work, nor has it reduced EEOC claims alleging sexual harassment. Given the sheer volume of #MeToo reports over the past 30 years, reasonable minds would likely agree that what we’re doing to prevent and address workplace harassment is NOT WORKING. Millions over dollars in settlement of sexual harassment claims have changed hands, but the harassment has not stopped . . . or even changed.

I know why, after looking at this issue from BOTH sides (e.g. as an EEOC prosecutor and longtime employment defense lawyer) for over 20 years. And here’s how I would tweak our Sylvester McMonkey McBean Sexual Harassment Machine:

I.  Exclude “Sexual Harassment” from Employment Practices Liability (EPL) Coverage

When Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1991 in November 1991 (i.e. after the contentious Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill hearings), the insurance industry recognized an opportunity; after all, where there is RISK, they purport to offer a REMEDY, right? Thus, with CRA 1991’s introduction of jury trials, punitive and compensatory damages, and attorneys’ fees as enforcement tools, more and more insurance carriers started offering Employment Practices Liability coverage  to mitigate the costs (attorneys’ fees) and risks (judgments, settlements) of discrimination and harassment claims. Twenty-five years after CRA 1991, most employers (over 80%) now have some kind of EPL insurance to cover attorneys’ fees and settlements related to sexual harassment claims. By design, EPL insurance took the sting out of the stick of CRA 1991’s enhanced remedies.

Sexual harassment, however, is an INTENTIONAL and DELIBERATE act, unlike the other kinds of hazards and “accidents” for which employers purchase liability insurance (e.g. premises liability, workers’ compensation, malpractice). Indeed, the whole theory behind business liability insurance is that despite our best efforts, accidents happen even when we are not behaving negligently: people slip, things break, employees get hurt. But sexual harassment is quite different: sexual harassment is a deliberate effort to demean women and define them sexually as a “piece of meat” instead of as a peer or typically, as an intellectual superior. Men’s choice to view women in sexual terms is designed to humiliate, to reinforce that no matter how smart, talented, hard-working and worthy they are, the existing male-dominated power structure will NEVER take them seriously. I felt that way each time the Regional Attorney of the EEOC’s Denver Office told me that, despite my JD/MSW degrees as a civil rights fellow at Washington University in St. Louis, he’d hired me because of my “pretty blue eyes” and/or because “I was easy on the eyes.”

Insurance is simply not available for other INTENTIONAL and DELIBERATE acts or torts like assault, battery, murder, false imprisonment, etc. Can you imagine trying to buy insurance in case you decide to beat up or murder your neighbor? No doubt, if such insurance existed, insurance carriers would sell it and people (especially in the South) would buy it. Such policies do not exist, however, because they offend our public policy favoring the imposition of penalties for intentional or reckless violent behavior. Congress could, through legislation, effectively nullify all EPL coverage for employee sexual harassment claims as against public policy, which would FORCE employers to take active measures to prevent, respond to, and immediately correct workplace harassment. Sexual harassment is PREVENTABLE, but only in organizations that take it seriously through annual training, a strong reporting infrastructure, prompt quality investigations, and punishment for substantiated harassment.

II.  Dethrone “High Value Harassers”

Organizations construct entire systems to protect their High Value Harassers. In large self-insured organizations, the C-Suite has already set aside substantial reserves to pay out sexual harassment claims anticipated from a KNOWN RISK like Bill O’Reilly, Bill Cosby, Harvey Weinstein . . . in the cases of celebrity serial harassers like Charlie Rose, Kevin Spacey, Louis CK and others, their personal harassment risk factors into their contract negotiations. Thus, when the sexual harassment and assault complaints inevitably come, they get processed through the Sylvester McMonkey McBean Sexual Harassment Machine with little, if any, impact on the bottom line: reserved funds get paid out, confidentiality agreements get signed, and the serial harasser gets back to the business of harassing . . . with impunity.

Employers, especially public and publicly-traded ones, can no longer afford High Value Harassers. As recent events illustrate, High Value Harassers cost organizations more than money: they squander immeasurable amounts in public goodwill, credibility, productivity and talent that leaves for greener, non-groping pastures.

III.  Recognize the Psychodynamics of Harassment

Sexual harassment has become the business of lawyers. Over the past 25 years, however, lawyers have not proven terribly effective at leveling the playing field and/or at eradicating sexual harassment from our workplaces. Legal tools do not always fix social problems, as we have seen with drug addiction, domestic violence, inequitable opportunity, etc. Thus, we MUST invite other experts to the discussion, including social and industrial psychologists, HR executives, andragogy (adult learning) professionals, artists, poets, shamans, etc. These other experts would reveal a universal truth about sexual harassment, a conclusion they all reached from different paths:

Harassers never perceive their own conduct as harassing.

And never means never. Because of cognitive dissonance (a psychological phenomenon afflicting us all), “Harassers” cannot imagine the possibility that (1) their attention or affection is unwelcome and/or (2) their audience could hear or experience a different message than they intended. Over 20 years, I’ve heard just about everything:

  • I was just kidding! Don’t be so sensitive!
  • I was complimenting her when I said she had a great ass!
  • I did not harass her; I just said I wanted to have sex with her.
  • It’s just locker room talk or horseplay!
  • When you’re a star, they let you do anything.
  • I thought she’d be flattered–I don’t invite just anyone to my room to watch me jerk off.

Effective training on sexual harassment challenges potential harassers to consider the possible disconnect between their intended message and the “heard” message; to understand the power dynamics that color every interaction with a subordinate; to embrace the reality that MOST women find sexual overtures really off-putting and demeaning at work; to accept that sexual harassment can jeopardize their careers and credibility just about more than anything else, etc. Effective sexual harassment training, therefore, draws on other tools borrowed from other disciplines like psychology, social psychology, management, and even law enforcement.

At this stage of our journey toward equal opportunity and harassment-free workplaces, we MUST evaluate and modify our methods, methods that have not proven terribly effective over the past 25 years. Otherwise, we will perpetuate a Sylvester McMonkey McBean Sexual Harassment Machine in which a substantial amount of money changes hands between employers, insurance carriers, and lawyers, but nothing else changes for the women in our workplaces. We need to deconstruct a sham machine that has tricked us into believing that it is “doing something” other than collecting and spitting out money, while enriching the insurance, HR, and legal industries.

Change Offers Clarity: EEO in Trump’s America

After my stint at the EEOC (1997-2000), I vowed that I would not take on another employee-side case. I had many reasons, but the main one was this: the emotional aspects of employee-side litigation are simply harder and the stakes are higher. After losing their jobs, many people’s lives implode. Financial insecurity creates new pressures, testing even the strongest relationships. They lose their homes. The constant “wound-opening” of litigation renews their rage with each deadline. For an “empath” with a competitive streak, the pressure is palpable, even painful sometimes. Sure, discrimination allegations also cut employers (e.g., HR folks, managers) deeply, but usually without risking their personal welfare and faith in fairness. And so, I’ve spent the better part of 17 years working with EMPLOYERS and HR professionals, helping to prevent bad employment decisions before they happen, “shutting down” bad litigation risks quickly, and fighting vigorously only when making an important point–e.g., EEOC v. Picture People.  

But the election of Donald J. Trump changed everything.  After the election, it became obvious that an era of tolerance and civil rights evolution that I’d taken for granted was over.  My daughter’s elementary school–which proudly hosts a Newcomer program for newly settled immigrants and refugees–became the target of hate graffiti by Westside “Deutches Jungvolk” (Hitler Youth) a few days later.



We were not alone. The Southern Poverty Law Center has reported that hate groups and hate crimes have skyrocketed since the election. And, as an old social worker, I know that where there is violence, there is FIRST discrimination. Employees most vulnerable to violence (e.g., LGBT, immigrant, women, religious and ethnic minorities) experience the GENERATIONAL economic violence of inequitable employment opportunities and its stagnating effect on social mobility. Thus, I expected some uptick in workplace discrimination and harassment complaints, but I was not prepared for the volume in calls for help that I would receive through my website and Facebook, especially from my LGBT friends.

The Trump administration’s employment policy oscillates 180 degrees away from Obama’s sometimes overly pro-employee positions. Trump has literally gutted the budgets of the Department of Labor, the NLRB, and coming soon, the EEOC.  He’s pillaged the budgets of other important programs like Meals on Wheels, Head Start, and Energy Assistance for low income seniors. By design, employers should flourish under Trump’s policies, with limited (if any) governmental enforcement of the rules requiring OVERTIME, a minimum wage, non-discrimination in federal contracts, family leave protections, etc. With Trump on employers’ side and with the deliberate evisceration of federal enforcement programs, employers do NOT need me anymore.

And, if they do need me, I’m happy to help via, which offers a customized and cost-effective online training solution for employers. Unlike most legal compliance training, the Hub draws on other disciplines (e.g., psychology, law enforcement) to offer programming that is uniquely effective for adult learners like managers.  It’s cool stuff.

Plug aside, extraordinary times call for extraordinary adaptations. It’s time to step up. It’s time to help. It’s time to fill in the gaps left by pithy and anemic, if any, future federal enforcement.  And so, after the election, I started hand-picking cases to prosecute on behalf of EMPLOYEES. But before anyone accuses me of TREASON again (I faced this allegation when I left the EEOC to work with employers in 2000), EEO Legal Solutions has NOT morphed into a plaintiff-side personal injury type of firm.  After all, I have been extremely critical of personal injury lawyers who entered the employment law field after passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991 (CRA 1991) over 25 years ago. Because of their focus on financial gain, they have laser-focused on cases that yield greater damages, especially TERMINATION cases involving high wage-earners. As a result, data demonstrates that the great March for Jobs and Freedom that started in August, 1963 has largely stalled for the people that Title VII was most intended to help (e.g., African-Americans, women, Latinos/as), based on several metrics of progress and workplace inclusiveness. Since CRA 1991, employee-side lawyers have prosecuted the wrong cases for the wrong reasons.

Thus, EEO Legal Solutions is actively seeking employee-side cases that focus on:

  • LGBTQ Workplace Rights and Protections: since the election, there’s been an upsurge in discrimination against LGBTQ employees. We’re prosecuting an LGBTQ discrimination matter that shows, unfortunately, how vulnerable even top-performing LGBTQ employees are to termination after the introduction of a bigot into their supervisory chain. Likewise, discrimination against transitioning and transgender employees remains rampant.  If the government cannot (or will not) put a stop to it, then we must get out our “litigation” and “advocacy” tools.
  •  HIRING Discrimination Against Women, Racial/Ethnic/Religious Minorities, LGBTQ Employees:  most plaintiff-side lawyers shy away from HIRING cases because . . . well, they’re much harder and far less lucrative.  Hiring cases are harder because in a typical “cohort analysis” (i.e., comparing the rejected employee to the selected employee), courts are deferential to the employer’s judgment regarding which candidate was “better.” Likewise, in discriminatory hiring cases, employees often quickly land comparable employment elsewhere, thereby reducing their monetary and psychological damages. Thus, in FY2015, only 8% of the EEOC’s charge intake involved HIRING matters; over 75% of charges filed involved TERMINATION decisions.

But, if we’re going to “move the needle” re the economic mobility of women and racial, ethnic, gender, and LGBTQ “minorites,” we need to return our attention to HIRING matters.  And with a little know-how, HIRING cases are not that complicated.  In fact, while at Biglaw, I defended several large multinational corporations in EEOC systemic and directed investigations involving alleged hiring “selection barriers.” Moreover, I teach a popular course on how to use adverse impact calculators to analyze HIRING data.  I love this geeky math stuff, and it’s time to put that quirky passion to good use.

I fear that workplace horror stories are only starting, given (a) the severe budgetary cuts to federal enforcement agencies and (b) how emboldened President Trump’s base has become in expressing anti-LGBTQ, anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic, and racist ideas.  As these stories find their way to you, please keep in mind that I’m here to help if I can.

Merrily Archer, Esq., M.S.W.

(303) 248-3769 (office)