How We Help

Workplace Advocacy

At EEO Legal Solutions, not all solutions are “legal” . . .

Wait a minute. That sounds bad.

At EEO Legal Solutions, we have other “tools” (e.g. insights, skills, solutions) in our toolbelts besides litigation. In fact, litigation is just one of many tools we use to SOLVE WORKPLACE PROBLEMS for both employers and employees.

That’s right, for both employers and employees.

When founded in 2012, EEO Legal Solutions exclusively represented employers, providing training and compliance counseling services to employers large and small. Then, in June 2015, we spun off WorkplaceTrainingHub.com to provide a cost-effective training solution for employers. Just as WorkplaceTrainingHub.com was starting to take off with training gigs for SHRM organizations and employers throughout the country, the November 2016 election happened.

Two days later, my eight-year old’s school–a Newcomer School that welcomes, provides a special early curriculum for, and integrates immigrant children–was tagged with swastikas and other racist graffiti from the Deutsche’s Jungvolk (“Hitler Youth”), a neo-Nazi gang. Here’s a photo of my husband with other parents trying to scrub off hate.

Something changed. And then calls started coming in from workers representing all walks of life, with almost unimaginable narratives about cruel epithets and overt discrimination. Usually, we referred these folks to other attorneys . . . but then, we started to listen. We then realized that enforcement agencies on the federal and state level would be “budget-starved” into complete inefficacy (they were almost there anyway). What relief, we wondered, could these agencies provide to employees when faced with staggering budget cuts? Worse, most members of the plaintiff’s bar prefer to represent high wage workers because they can recover more damages and by extension, larger contingent fees. What about the lower wage workers? Because of historic job segregation patterns, a disproportionate percentage of low wage workers are Latino/a, African-American, and female–i.e. the groups making the LEAST amount of progress toward leveling the playing field over the past 25 years.

Further, overt discrimination against LGBT workers remains a fact of life, even in states like Colorado that prohibit LGBT discrimination and provide remedies to victims. Despite these protections, LGBT discrimination happens every day.

And so, we changed our focus. And we started listening to employees, as we grow increasingly worried about the certain retrenchment of workplace protections that have evolved over 50 years.

We still believe in the importance of tools designed to help EMPLOYERS avoid employee disputes and lawsuits. To that end, we continue to offer programming through WorkplaceTrainingHub.com. We have also partnered with several Human Resources (HR) consultancies that provide excellent employee relations advice well below the cost of attorney time. In fact, their job is to keep an everyday workplace “people problem” from becoming a “legal problem.” And when they do (and occasionally they do!), these HR consultants work with us at a fraction of the cost of Biglaw attorney counseling services.

Unfortunately, we cannot help every employee who deserves our time. But we can point you in the right direction. We’re looking for specific matters to litigate in the public interest, either on an individual or class basis:

  • all LGBT workplace discrimination, but particularly discrimination against transitioning and/or transgender applicants and employees;
  • class-based discrimination in HIRING and PROMOTION of African-American, Latino/a and/or female workers; and,
  • denial of due process and adequate remedies by Colorado governmental agencies purporting to protect employees in the workplace.

If you need our help or would like more information, please contact us and we will ask you to complete a Confidential Intake Form. Knowing a little more about your problem can help us decide whether we’re the best advocates or whether one of the many other qualified attorneys to which we refer could help better–i.e. more knowledgeable about a subject area, able to jump in more quickly.

“Go where you’re needed and work yourself out of a job” is an old social worker adage. In this current political and employment climate, advocating on behalf of employees is where we’re needed.

Merrily Archer, Esq., M.S.W., June 29, 2018